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In the Spotlight

Monday, April 29, 2013

CPTC Awarded College Spark Grant



College Spark of Washington announced today that Clover Park Technical College has been awarded a $149,670 grant as a part of the Community Grants Program.

The grant will be used over three years to develop and pilot a system for using high school transcripts to place recent high school graduates in math courses.

College Spark Washington, a private foundation located in Seattle, announced grants totaling nearly $1.4 million to 11 organizations across Washington to support college readiness and retention for low-income students.

“These 11 grantees represent the most promising college readiness and degree completion projects from nearly 60 applicants to the Community Grants Program,” says Steve Pumphrey, chair of the College Spark Washington Board of Trustees. “We are delighted to partner with them to improve student success.”

This is the first year grantees were asked to focus on a new set of guidelines. Grantees are offered flexibility in how they approach their work, but must measure results using at least one of the four indicators of future college success. The four Community Grants Program outcome indicators are:

1. Increasing the number of students that take and pass Algebra by the eighth grade;

2. Decreasing the number of middle school students that trigger two of three early warning indicators: five or more absences per semester; course failure; suspension or expulsion.

3. Decreasing the number of students that require development education in college; and

4. Increasing the number of students that earn their first college-level credit in English or math.

Campus Input Requested on Wellness Committee Survey


College Community,
The Wellness Committee at CPTC is interested in learning more about how we can support the healthy lifestyle efforts and general wellness of staff and students. In order to move forward, we need your input on what specific information and activities you are most interested in.

Please take a few minutes to complete this short survey, which will help us determine where we should focus our efforts.

The survey is available at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WSD9J9G

Tawny Dotson
Survey Chair, Wellness Committee

Friday, April 26, 2013

Call for Nominations - Distinguished Alumnus & Puget Sound Energy Distinguished Faculty

Do you know an alumnus or faculty member who is extraordinary?

Nominations for the Distinguished Alumnus Award and the Puget Sound Energy Distinguished Faculty Award are being accepted now through 4 p.m., Thursday, May 16, 2013. The winners will be announced at graduation on Wednesday, June 19, 2013.

The Distinguished Alumnus will demonstrate outstanding merit in one or more of the following: professional accomplishments, service to the community, and/or service to Clover Park Technical College.

The Puget Sound Energy Distinguished Faculty will demonstrate outstanding merit in one or more of the following: innovative teaching strategies, teaching which inspires student learning, curriculum development using alternative instructional delivery methods, involvement in College committees and activities, professional development in field of expertise or teaching, and/or promoting technical education through involvement with professional associations, industry, and the community.

Nomination forms are available at www.cptc.edu/distinguishedalumnus and www.cptc.edu/distinguishedfaculty. Questions may be directed to Heather Ervin, CPTC Foundation, 253-589-5732 or heather.ervin@cptc.edu.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

WorkForce Central Offers Another Scholarship to CPTC Students!


Pierce County Residents over the age of 18 attending Clover Park Technical College can now apply for  funding of tuition, books, fees, supplies and limited living expenses up to $3,000 through WorkForce Central.

Applicants must be graduating in three quarters or less, meet federal low-income guidelines, and be studying for an in-demand career.

These funds are only available through June 30 and will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

To apply or for more information, call Debra Gibson at 253-448-8287 or email dgibson@workforce-central.org.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

CPTC Instructor Named Phi Theta Kappa Distinguished Advisor

Kathleen Hathaway, Human Services instructor at Clover Park Technical College, has been named a 2013 Distinguished Advisor for her role as the advisor of CPTC's Beta Omicron Gamma Chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society.

The award was presented at the annual PTK meeting April 2-4 in San Jose, Calif. The honor is given only once to advisors who have served for more than four years in a chapter role. Hathaway has served as CPTC's Beta Omicron Chapter advisor for 7 years and was the founding advisor of CPTC's club.

In addition to Hathaway's award, CPTC student Martin Trinidad was elected as the Greater Northwest Region Vice President. Trinidad is a Computer Networking and Information Security Systems student at CPTC and a veteran who is active in CPTC's Veterans' Club.

Earlier in the year, the Beta Omicron Chapter received a 2nd place award for Honors in Action and a 2nd place award for Distinguished Chapter Officer Team at the regional level.

For more information on CPTC's PTK Chapter visit www.ptkcptc.com.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

SPSC Updates Strategic Goals and Objectives


Campus community,

The SPSC met today and made revisions to the proposed strategic goals and objectives based upon comments received. The majority of respondents, 89.47 percent, felt they could see their department or division in the proposed strategic goals and objectives. 

We invite you to make comments this week via SurveyMonkey or your division’s representative. The survey is available at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/C9H7QJ9. The committee will be meeting to add some definition to the key values and will have one more meeting next Monday to discuss the connection to the College’s core themes and the goals.

Next week, the SPSC will make their final recommendation and forward the vision, mission, values, strategic goals and objectives to the Board of Trustees for consideration at the May 8 meeting. Once adopted, divisions and departments will be tasked with developing measurable strategies that are specific to their respective areas to meet the objectives and goals.

Thank you for your continued interest and involvement in our process!

Debbie and Claire

New Goals and Objectives (items in bold are changes):

1. Promote student success
i. Provide an environment that supports student retention, persistence and completion
ii. Invest in personal and professional growth for all employees
iii. Celebrate staff and student achievement, success and creativity

2. Champion equity
i. Create an understanding of equitable principles 
ii. Identify and implement opportunities for increasing equity 
iii. Identify and address achievement gaps

3. Build an educated community 
i. Ensure student learning outcomes are aligned with current professional standards 
ii. Respond to labor market needs and close workforce gaps 
iii. Expand lifelong learning and professional credentialing opportunities 
iv. Strengthen educational transitions between K-12 and higher education (reorganized bullet)

4. Enhance institutional capacity 
i. Create and improve systems to support a culture of inquiry and evidence-based decision making 
ii. Review and revise systems and processes for effectiveness 
iii. Judiciously manage the acquisition, use and maintenance of goods and materials 
iv. Integrate technology across the college

5. Promote innovation 
i. Upgrade the college’s innovation support structures 
ii. Create a culture where all ideas can be shared and validated 
iii. Develop entrepreneurial attitudes, behaviors and skills that can be applied across the college 
iv. Develop collaborative and innovation partnerships with internal and external stakeholders.

6. Create and maintain a sustainable college community 
i. Cultivate relationships and explore options to find and utilize alternative funding sources 
ii. Maintain and update existing infrastructure 
iii. Implement sustainable practices 
iv. Document our institutional knowledge 

7. Foster community engagement and social responsibility i. Build and maintain community partnerships 
ii. Promote and strengthen internship and service opportunities 
iii. Identify and develop opportunities for community education and outreach 
iv. Promote a welcoming and safe environment

Friday, April 19, 2013

Stereotyped 101 Coming to CPTC


On May 2, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the McGavick Center, Karith Foster and Adam Lehman will present a 60-minute presentation addressing homophobia and racism through educational comedy called Stereotyped 101.

Foster and Lehman are two comedians, one black and one gay who are putting a face on the issues of homophobia and racism. Their personal experiences have given them the material to address these issues with humor, wit, and candor.

The presentation consists of comedy, testimonials, and a Q&A session that will address not only their personal experiences, but also examples from current news stories. Through humor they offer a very raw perspective of the reality of homophobia and racism.

Please join this event co-sponsored by the CPTC Diversity Committee and the Campus Activities Board.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Senate Confirms CPTC Trustee Lua Pritchard



Faaluaina Pritchard, who was appointed to the Clover Park Technical College Board of Trustees by then Gov. Christine Gregoire on Oct. 3, 2011, has been confirmed by the Washington State Senate! Pritchard's new term will expire in September of 2016.

Congratulations Lua and thank you for continuing to serve CPTC.

To learn more about Senate Gubernatorial Appointment 9062, the bill that confirmed Pritchard you can visit http://apps.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?bill=9062&year=2013.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

SPSC Update: Draft Goals and Objectives Available for Feedback

Campus Community,

The Strategic Planning Committee would like your feedback on the following, DRAFT Strategic Goals and Objectives.

1. Promote student success
i. Launch and monitor interventions to reduce barriers to completion
ii. Provide an environment that increases student retention and persistence
iii. Invest in personal and professional growth for all employees
iv. Celebrate staff and student achievement, success and creativity

2. Champion equity
i. Create an understanding of equitable principles
ii. Identify and implement opportunities for increasing equity
iii. Identify and address achievement gaps

3. Build an educated community
i. Ensure student-learning outcomes are aligned with current professional standards
ii. Create a system to track industry employment and trends
iii. Expand lifelong learning and professional credentialing opportunities
iv. Strengthen K12-20 education continuum

4. Enhance institutional capacity
i. Create and improve systems to support a culture of inquiry and evidence-based decision-making
ii. Review and revise systems and processes for effectiveness and innovation
iii. Judiciously manage the acquisition, use and maintenance of goods and materials
iv. Use technology to maximize college processes and systems

5. Promote innovation
i. Upgrade the college’s innovation support structures
ii. Create a culture where all ideas can be shared and validated
iii. Develop entrepreneurial attitudes, behaviors and skills that can be applied across the college
iv. Develop collaborative and innovation partnerships with internal and external stakeholders.

6. Create and maintain a sustainable college community
i. Cultivate relationships and explore options to find and utilize alternative funding sources
ii. Maintain and update existing infrastructure
iii. Implement sustainable practices
iv. Document our institutional knowledge

7. Foster community engagement and social responsibility
i. Build and maintain community partnerships
ii. Promote and strengthen internship and service opportunities
iii. Identify and develop opportunities for community education and outreach
iv. Promote a welcoming environment

We welcome feedback through our SPSC website (www.cptc.edu/spsc), or through the following SurveyMonkey Link (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FXCJLCV). You may also speak with your division's representative on the SPSC.

Please provide your feedback by 10 a.m. on Monday, April 22. The committee will meet again the afternoon of April 22 to respond to feedback and make revisions and/or clarifications.

The committee will present their final recommended strategic plan (vision, mission, values, goals and objectives) to the Board of Trustees for their adoption at their May 8 meeting. That meeting is open to the public to attend and we would encourage you to attend.


Thanks for your involvement!
Debbie and Claire

Monday, April 15, 2013

SEED mentorships help grow new sustainability projects


By: Ellie Ashford

When officials at Rose State College in Oklahoma decided to embrace sustainability, they weren’t sure how to go about it. Thanks to a new mentorship initiative developed by the SEED Center, RSC was paired with Lane Community College, which has extensive experience in sustainability and was able to provide lots of advice.

The SEED (Sustainability Education and Economic Development) Center, a component of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), promotes efforts by two-year institutions to advance education and workforce training and practices to build the “green economy."

SEED’s Mentor Connect Project forms partnerships between community colleges that need help and those that have expertise to share.

“There is a growing pool of colleges and individual leaders at colleges that in some shape or form have had success with sustainability, green jobs training or clean energy programs, and we can connect them with colleges that are looking to advance what they've built,” said SEED Director Todd Cohen.

Mentor Connect Project: Connecting Colleges for Sustainability Skill Building
SEED was started 2009 because of the realization that “sustainability was going to be an issue that touched many, many community colleges,” said LCC President Mary Spilde, who was vice chair of the AACC board of trustees at the time and was instrumental in creating SEED. “Having resources available at the national level is an efficient way to move the sustainability agenda,” she said, so encouraging colleges to collaborate and form partnerships is the next logical step.

The Mentor Connect Project started in 2012 with five partnerships, and SEED is in the process of expanding it to other colleges. SEED this week released a report summarizing promising practices.

Buying into sustainability
For RSC, the mentorship experience was “extraordinary,” said Stan Greil, vice president of workforce development. He values the opportunity to have had free, personal assistance from Roger Ebbage, LCC’s energy management program coordinator and one of the nation’s leading experts in campus sustainability.

Bill Clark, coordinator of the Oklahoma Environmental Training Center at RSC and the college’s operations director, attended training sessions at LCC, which has an Institute for Sustainable Practices.

RSC “hadn’t done much in the way of sustainability other than a little bit of recycling,” Ebbage recalled. He urged RSC to “internalize sustainability on campus.” 

“If we’re teaching this, we also have to practice it ourselves,” he said. “That was the biggest message for them, and they bought it.”

An energy audit
Ebbage and a colleague toured the RSC campus and pointed out steps the college could take to cut energy use and ways to tap the campus as a teaching tool in courses on energy efficiency.

“We looked at their utility bills, helped them figure out how much energy they’re using and compared that with other colleges in the same climate zone,” Ebbage said.
He also shared the instructional content in LCC’s degree programs in energy efficiency, sustainability and water conservation and met with RSC’s advisory committee for energy and sustainability.

SEED webinars 
That committee developed a policy on sustainability, which the RSC board of regents approved last year. Next month, the committee will present recommendations to the president and board on how to implement it, RSC's Greil said. The recommendations may include specific measures such as changing the temperature settings for heating and cooling, turning off lights and computers in unused classrooms, unplugging fax machines and copiers at night, installing motion sensors for lights, purchasing more energy-efficient equipment and scheduling classes to make the best use of HVAC systems.

RSC is just a mile from Tinker Air Force Base, the largest user of energy in the Air Force, so Greil hopes the college can form a partnership to help the base adopt conservation measures. 

Greil would also like to establish education programs on energy efficiency and incorporate sustainability into other courses, such as math and English.

“We’re very excited about this,” he said. “We really want to put sustainability into every aspect of the campus, although it will take a while. If it wasn’t for the SEED mentorship, we wouldn’t be where we are now.”

Expertise shared
Other partnerships formed in the pilot year of the SEED Center Mentor Connect Project include:
Monroe Community College in New York wanted to expand career pathways in renewable energy but didn’t have labor market data showing which industries were likely to experience job growth. Los Angeles Trade and Technical College shared its environmental analysis tool for gauging demand in the local economy. As a result of that exercise, MCC developed a stackable certificate approach and a new career pathway integrating solar thermal technology into an associate degree program in HVAC and refrigeration.
The Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) needed help integrating sustainability consistently into the curricula of its 16 colleges. KCTCS was matched with mentors at Wake Technical Community College and Davidson County Community College, both in North Carolina. They helped KCTCS launch professional development sessions for faculty that resulted in common definitions of sustainability, an inventory of sustainability-related courses and efforts to incorporate sustainability into general education courses.
Athens Technical College in Georgia received help from Georgia Piedmont Technical College in developing an environmental engineering technology program. ATC is also considering its mentor’s example by incorporating building automation courses into its HVAC program.
Clover Park Technical College received advice from its mentor, Sante Fe Community College (New Mexico), about integrating its sustainability-related initiatives into a long-term, institution-wide commitment to sustainability.

New partnerships forming
The SEED Center is seeking colleges interested in joining in the second round of the Mentor Connect Project. There is no cost to participate, but colleges must be members of the SEED Center. Colleges selected as mentors will receive some limited compensation.

SEED toolkits
Several SEED members have already requested help with things like identifying labor market needs in clean energy and aligning the curriculum to those needs, creating a sustainable agriculture course and incorporating sustainability as a core institutional principle in the college’s governance system, Cohen said. He anticipates community colleges recognized for their success in sustainability through the SEED Center’s Green Genome Awardsprogram will want to share their expertise as mentors.

Colleges interested in being assigned a mentor can complete a self-assessment questionnaire to help them decide what to focus on. SEED will then identify individuals at other colleges who could help, facilitate an introductory phone conversation and assist partners in developing an action plan that can be accomplished within nine months.
The colleges will then proceed on their own. SEED will periodically check in to see how things are going and, at the end of the project, will interview the partners to see whether the mentor relationship has met its objectives.
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